FAQ

How it works

Most places, yes! It depends on how many citizen scientists have uploaded how many observations to online platforms. If we can’t find enough images, we’ll consider expanding the geographic or taxonomic ranges. 

Online from various Creative Commons sources, making sure to attribute them properly. We’re adding new sources constantly as we find them.

We use global biodiversity databases and citizen science apps to rank observed species in a region by the number of times its been observed. This should match pretty well with how likely anyone is to spot those same species as they travel with their Flexi Field Guide.

You’ll be able to provide instructions at checkout to guide as us to how to proceed in this event.

There’s no possible way to have the correct common names for every circumstance. If you’d like, you have the option to request only scientific binomials on the labels.

Customisation

Yes, absolutely! 

Keeping in mind that we can’t always source images, so while we can probably put together your  list of favourite birds, we might struggle to do a Field Guide to Earthworms. 

It really depends on the format of guide. You’ll get more species on a PICNICKER blanket, and quite fewer on a ZIPCASE. For each format in the Flexi Field Guide Shop, we’ve indicated how many images we can include.

Yes, we have an option  at checkout where you can pay a small fee to include your custom logo. Banners or squares work best; vertical portraits are more difficult.

Special cases

We generally try to avoid them, but sometimes we don’t spot them. 

If this is important to you, please let us know in advance.

If it’s too obscure, we probably won’t find enough imagery or records to put together a field guide. If this is the case, we’ll let you know.

Did you know lichens have actually evolved 5 times over the ancient history of Earths?

Lichens aren’t a discreet taxonomic branch, which means they can’t be searched properly, so if you’re really interested in a lichen field guide, let us know directly at [email protected]

Due to the limited number of smartphone-science observers in the water, there’s a much smaller pool of observations to explore. We’ll do our best and let you know if we run into any troubles.

Fixes

Uh-oh!

Please take some clear photographs to indicate the problem and then email them to us via [email protected]

Uh-oh!

 Please do let us know what’s going on and we’ll try to make it better: [email protected]

Uh-oh!

Please take some clear photographs to indicate the problem and then email them to us via [email protected]

For retailers

We would love to talk to you! Please get in touch: [email protected]

There is no minimum order.

Yes, we have an option  at checkout where you can pay a small fee to include your custom logo. Banners or squares work best; vertical portraits are more difficult.

Yes, we can investigate this for you.

Please get in touch:

[email protected]

For groups

We would love to talk to you! Please get in touch: [email protected]

Yes, we have an option  at checkout where you can pay a small fee to include your custom logo. Banners or squares work best; vertical portraits are more difficult.

Ordering

There’s an option to nominate your own location at checkout. Let us know if you have any troubles:

[email protected]

Shipping

This entirely depends on where you are located. We don’t have a warehouse, so items are sent directly to you. This keeps prices low and speeds up delivery times.  Between 2 and 4 weeks is a reasonable time to expect; any long and we’ll do our best to track it down.

To keep prices low, we don’t have a warehouse: Different items are produced in different locations, so they may arrive at different times. 

About FFG

Yes, it’s a great place for Nature Lovers!

You can learn more about it at https://www.tasmaniangeographic.com

Not really. A parataxonomist, using comparison techniques and photography tools to identify seperate species for biodiversity assessments. This is a bit different from the naming and classification that taxonomists do. You can still run biodiversity statistics without diving into that level of detail.

Random

Nowadays, I’m quite fond of the the higher-altitude Tasmanian redwood, known as Pencil Pine:

Athrotaxis cupressoides